through serving a local delicacy to visitors, SPI is both creating jobs for women in the village of Kaole and improving their relationship with local cultural heritage


    The Site   The site of Kaole dates back to the 8th Century AD. The main period of occupation was from AD1400-1800, and the ruins contain 22 tombs and two mosques, including what is likely the oldest mosque on the East African Mainland. However, because of poor relationships with the local community the site still suffers from destruction from encroachment and unsustainable use of the site.

The Site

The site of Kaole dates back to the 8th Century AD. The main period of occupation was from AD1400-1800, and the ruins contain 22 tombs and two mosques, including what is likely the oldest mosque on the East African Mainland. However, because of poor relationships with the local community the site still suffers from destruction from encroachment and unsustainable use of the site.

    The Community   The community of Kaole, near the town of Bagamayo, is a fishing and farming community with limited economic opportunities. The community has grown frustrated from witnessing the tourism to the nearby ruins without seeing benefits for themselves. This has created a poor relationship with the managers of the site.

The Community

The community of Kaole, near the town of Bagamayo, is a fishing and farming community with limited economic opportunities. The community has grown frustrated from witnessing the tourism to the nearby ruins without seeing benefits for themselves. This has created a poor relationship with the managers of the site.

    The Project   SPI is working with the local community and heritage authorities to create a sustainable business in the community for local women to benefit from tourism. This business will be based on the local delicacy of sea-snail soup - a favorite with visitors! Local women will make and sell the soup, as well as local hand-made crafts, near the site.

The Project

SPI is working with the local community and heritage authorities to create a sustainable business in the community for local women to benefit from tourism. This business will be based on the local delicacy of sea-snail soup - a favorite with visitors! Local women will make and sell the soup, as well as local hand-made crafts, near the site.


Achievements

  • Eleven local women have formed a business called Wauto-Kaole. This stands for WAmama (women), Utamaduni (heritage/culture) na TOndo (shellfish) in Swahili!

  • The women have received training in business skills and begun selling soup of visitors.

  • The site authorities are very happy with the project and relationships are improving!

The Big thing we have learned

  • Good relationships can be developed with hard work and local knowledge!

The Future

  • The business is just beginning and the women need more training to make it sustainable. We need your help to do that!