Working with Forest Rangers (SERNANP), SPI is creating new Economic opportunities for local communities from their unique local cultural and natural heritage


  The Site The Pomac Forest Historical Sanctuary, situated on the north coast of Peru, covers 5,900 hectares of Tropical Pacific Desert. Not only does it contain exceptional biological diversity, especially birds, but 36 pyramids of the ancient Lambayeque culture. This includes Batan Grande and 'Huaca Del Oro' (Pyramid of Gold) were the famous Lord of Sican, along with his famous gold mask, was discovered in 1995.  

 

The Site

The Pomac Forest Historical Sanctuary, situated on the north coast of Peru, covers 5,900 hectares of Tropical Pacific Desert. Not only does it contain exceptional biological diversity, especially birds, but 36 pyramids of the ancient Lambayeque culture. This includes Batan Grande and 'Huaca Del Oro' (Pyramid of Gold) were the famous Lord of Sican, along with his famous gold mask, was discovered in 1995.  

  The Community The forest is surrounded by a variety of communities, who often know little of the archaeology within the forest and gain little benefits from the significant cultural and natural heritage on their doorstep. While the communities have receive some artisan training before, these were not aimed at being sustainable.

 

The Community

The forest is surrounded by a variety of communities, who often know little of the archaeology within the forest and gain little benefits from the significant cultural and natural heritage on their doorstep. While the communities have receive some artisan training before, these were not aimed at being sustainable.

  The Project SPI is working with four communities, developing their existing craft skills, creating new products with them, and training them in business and marketing skills.  In partnership with the National Service of Natural Protected Areas (SERNANP) in Lambayeque, we are increasing the opportunities for local communities to sell local goods inspired by their cultural and natural heritage so their businesses can be independent and sustainable.

 

The Project

SPI is working with four communities, developing their existing craft skills, creating new products with them, and training them in business and marketing skills.  In partnership with the National Service of Natural Protected Areas (SERNANP) in Lambayeque, we are increasing the opportunities for local communities to sell local goods inspired by their cultural and natural heritage so their businesses can be independent and sustainable.


Achievements

  • In early 2017, 17 participants from five different local associations, and we've had an enthusiastic response to the training.  Local people are grabbing the opportunity to build a new future!
  • New products are ready, with new packaging and branding expressing local heritage.

the big thing we learned

  • Severe rains and flooding in this part of Peru have caused huge problems locally and delayed the project.  But the participants are determined to succeed.

The Future

  • Sales are beginning strongly and we hope they will go from strength to strength!